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Old 01-21-2018, 08:00 AM   #1
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Default Power Awning Model Info

Hi all -

Looking for a little help. I'm getting ready to order and replace the awning fabric on our new (to us) FunFinder. One thing I'm having trouble determining is the exact model awning I have. It's a 14' (arm to arm) power awning, the Dometic/A&E sticker on it says:

MFG No. 916FT14.001B
MFG/PNC 958523159

Serial No. 12893854
SKU NO. 9108675021

The thing is I can't find anything using any of those numbers on the Dometic website (or anywhere for that matter). It looks like it's a 9100 series awning, but I'd like to know for sure before ordering the fabric and starting work on it.

Any ideas?


Thanks.
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Old 01-26-2018, 01:03 PM   #2
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Default awning fabric

I "think" ( but I am not sure ) you can just get the fabric from essentially any supplier. I too need to replace mine soon, and I've done some searches and it seems to be somewhat universal.

If you find out differently, please let us know.

geo
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Old 01-26-2018, 06:23 PM   #3
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Tanks Geo -

I bought fabric from RV Awnings Mart online for my 14' awning. Haven't done the install yet but through their eBay store it was only $119 + $19 shipping so I figure I don't have that much invested if it doesn't turn out. That said, reviews and feedback make it seem like a good deal. We'll see how it goes. I've got a trip out west coming up in about 10 days so I probably won't get to the install until we get back in late Feb sometime.

I'm still looking for some model specific instructions before I cut the existing fabric and/or start taking the roller off/apart.
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Old 02-15-2018, 07:35 PM   #4
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So we did the fabric install yesterday:

Wasn't able to find exact instructions for doing our model, but sorta pieced it together from watching a few different videos online and adapting what I saw to what we have.

Step one was to extend the awning a few inches until I could see daylight through the holes in the end on the rear roller cap (REAR cap - I wasted a few minutes trying on the front with no luck until I realized/remembered that the motor is on the front end...). You then need to put a pin through to hold the spring in place. I used a small 6" piece of steel that I had laying around, but a small diameter screwdriver should work too. Once the spring is locked into place I then used zip ties to keep the front and rear arms from extending any further.

After the spring and arms were secure I unplugged the motor leads at the top of the front arm and using a utility knife I cut the old awning fabric about an inch out from the side of the trailer and slid it out of the rail. Once that was off I unplugged the motor wires at the top of the front arm and removed the two bolts holding the roller ends to the arms (one on each). With my wife and I each on a ladder at either end we were able to lower the roller to the ground.

Once the roller was off the trailer I drilled out the three rivets on the front roller cap and slid the motor out the front end. Mark or make a note of the alignment so it goes back in properly when you reassemble, then just unroll the remaining fabric and slide it out the grooves and off the roller.

After we had everything off I spent a bit of time making sure that the grooves on the trailer and on the roller were all clean and smooth and I also padded and taped the top of the rear arm so it wouldn't snag the new fabric as we slid it into the groove on the trailer. To make things even easier, I used a small file and rounded over the ends of the trailer groove to help in feeding.
Then it was time to put the new fabric on.

Our replacement fabric had one sewn in plastic bolt rope at the top and one about six inches from the out edge edge for a fringe. It also included another bolt rope for the awning groove. It did not have two sewn in bolt ropes for the outer edge and fringe - more about that below.

Using two people and two ladders we fed the top bolt rope and fabric into the trailer groove until it was centered between the awning arms and let it unroll down the side of the trailer. Next we slowly slid the roller onto the fabric until it was also centered and set the roller on two saw horses next to the trailer. The instructions that came with the new fabric advised to "fold the fabric into the adjacent roller groove and insert the included plastic retainer to secure it. Well, I tried the fold and secure a few times and it just wasn't happening - So after a bit of brainstorming I decided to try using a screen splining roller that I had and Eureka! that was the ticket. I smoothed the fabric over the roller and rolled the splining tool into the groove and stretching the fabric tight. As I moved along my wife pushed the bolt rope in the groove, following me along and a few minutes later it was done.

After the fabric was all on the roller I replaced the motor and pop-riveted it back in place with three 3/16" aluminum rivets (make sure the ends are pointing the same way so they go back on the arms properly). We then set up the two ladders again and slowly rolled the fabric back onto the roller and up the side until we reached the top and then reconnected the roller ends to the arms and replaced and tightened the bolts.

Final steps were to plug the wires back together, remove the tie wraps holding the arms in place and to pull the pin that I had put in the rear cap to hold the spring.

Ran the awning in and out a few times to make it tracked properly and opened and closed and then it was time for a celebratory cocktail.

I'd say that from start to finish it probably took about an hour total, not including a Home Depot run for rivets. Total cost was less than $145 ($119 fabric, $19 shipping, $5.50 for a 50 pack of rivets) - Much nicer than the $350 - $500 that I had been quoted and it looks like new.


Hope this helps anyone considering DIYing it.
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Old 02-18-2018, 06:14 AM   #5
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Default Thanks for the write up

I know we are eventually going to have to replace ours. Good info for us.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SWFL FlyFisher View Post
So we did the fabric install yesterday:

Wasn't able to find exact instructions for doing our model, but sorta pieced it together from watching a few different videos online and adapting what I saw to what we have.

Step one was to extend the awning a few inches until I could see daylight through the holes in the end on the rear roller cap (REAR cap - I wasted a few minutes trying on the front with no luck until I realized/remembered that the motor is on the front end...). You then need to put a pin through to hold the spring in place. I used a small 6" piece of steel that I had laying around, but a small diameter screwdriver should work too. Once the spring is locked into place I then used zip ties to keep the front and rear arms from extending any further.

After the spring and arms were secure I unplugged the motor leads at the top of the front arm and using a utility knife I cut the old awning fabric about an inch out from the side of the trailer and slid it out of the rail. Once that was off I unplugged the motor wires at the top of the front arm and removed the two bolts holding the roller ends to the arms (one on each). With my wife and I each on a ladder at either end we were able to lower the roller to the ground.

Once the roller was off the trailer I drilled out the three rivets on the front roller cap and slid the motor out the front end. Mark or make a note of the alignment so it goes back in properly when you reassemble, then just unroll the remaining fabric and slide it out the grooves and off the roller.

After we had everything off I spent a bit of time making sure that the grooves on the trailer and on the roller were all clean and smooth and I also padded and taped the top of the rear arm so it wouldn't snag the new fabric as we slid it into the groove on the trailer. To make things even easier, I used a small file and rounded over the ends of the trailer groove to help in feeding.
Then it was time to put the new fabric on.

Our replacement fabric had one sewn in plastic bolt rope at the top and one about six inches from the out edge edge for a fringe. It also included another bolt rope for the awning groove. It did not have two sewn in bolt ropes for the outer edge and fringe - more about that below.

Using two people and two ladders we fed the top bolt rope and fabric into the trailer groove until it was centered between the awning arms and let it unroll down the side of the trailer. Next we slowly slid the roller onto the fabric until it was also centered and set the roller on two saw horses next to the trailer. The instructions that came with the new fabric advised to "fold the fabric into the adjacent roller groove and insert the included plastic retainer to secure it. Well, I tried the fold and secure a few times and it just wasn't happening - So after a bit of brainstorming I decided to try using a screen splining roller that I had and Eureka! that was the ticket. I smoothed the fabric over the roller and rolled the splining tool into the groove and stretching the fabric tight. As I moved along my wife pushed the bolt rope in the groove, following me along and a few minutes later it was done.

After the fabric was all on the roller I replaced the motor and pop-riveted it back in place with three 3/16" aluminum rivets (make sure the ends are pointing the same way so they go back on the arms properly). We then set up the two ladders again and slowly rolled the fabric back onto the roller and up the side until we reached the top and then reconnected the roller ends to the arms and replaced and tightened the bolts.

Final steps were to plug the wires back together, remove the tie wraps holding the arms in place and to pull the pin that I had put in the rear cap to hold the spring.

Ran the awning in and out a few times to make it tracked properly and opened and closed and then it was time for a celebratory cocktail.

I'd say that from start to finish it probably took about an hour total, not including a Home Depot run for rivets. Total cost was less than $145 ($119 fabric, $19 shipping, $5.50 for a 50 pack of rivets) - Much nicer than the $350 - $500 that I had been quoted and it looks like new.


Hope this helps anyone considering DIYing it.
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Old 02-18-2018, 04:04 PM   #6
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Excellent ! I've copied your post and kept in a email file for my future reference.
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