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Old 09-26-2018, 06:49 PM   #1
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Default Towing with a JGC

am possibly purchasing my Grandpas 2012 fun finder x-214wsdf and my tow vehicle is a 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee. That year Jeep is rated to tow 6200LBS. The 2012 214wsdf is 4,100lbs dry. I already towed it 3 hours home and it did do the job, but I was trying to stay at about 68 MPH. I think I need to go a little slower because it seemed a lot happier at 60MPH. anyone have any experience towing a trailer like that with with a 14 or newer grand Cherokee or Durango? Those years they are almost the same car. I am purchasing my Grandpas who has passed away so it's not like I can just pick a smaller trailer, It has a lot to do with sentimental value, and I am not ready to trade in the Jeep. Just trying to get others experiences. thanks!
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Old 09-26-2018, 08:49 PM   #2
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From a safety stand point, trailer tires are speed rated to go no faster than 65 mph. As for me, I found that the best speed from a mileage standpoint was about 62 mpg.
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Old 09-27-2018, 07:51 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twinster2 View Post
From a safety stand point, trailer tires are speed rated to go no faster than 65 mph. As for me, I found that the best speed from a mileage standpoint was about 62 mpg.
Yes, 65 mph speed rating unless running Goodyear Endurance or Maxxis which have a higher speed rating as indicated below:

"You’ll find the Endurance available in a number of 14-16 inch sizes with N-speed ratings, which is a step above the standard L or J rating found on most other trailer tires. Goodyear has also included a new ST 255/85R16 size. All sizes come with a limited tread warranty."

"On Maxxis M8008,

"High Speed" is used to differentiate the M8008 ST Radial from other products we offer that are intended for industrial and/or commercial use, in slow speed applications. The Maxxis M8008 ST Radial carries a "Q" speed rating. However, according to the Tire and Rim Association, the U.S. tire industry specification authority, inflation pressures and load specifications in general for any ST Radial trailer tires without a service description, regardless of the manufacturer, are designed and rated at 65 MPH. However, if the speed is higher than 65 MPH, the pressure and load need to be adjusted according to the following guidelines:
From 66 to 75 MPH – the tire inflation pressure needs to increase 10 PSI (not to exceed the maximum PSI the tire is rated for) but requires no load adjustment.
From 76 to 85 MPH – the tire inflation pressure needs to increase 10 PSI (not to exceed the maximum PSI the tire is rated for) and load should be reduced by 10%.
We hope this information is helpful. Thanks for your inquiry and interest in Maxxis Tires.
Best Regards,
Your Maxxis Support Team
--
Maxxis International – USA
Email: MaxxisSupport@maxxis.com | Web: maxxis.com"


Tire Speed Rating Chart

Speed Symbol Maximum Speed Vehicle Type
L 75 mph Off-Road & Light Truck Tires
M 81 mph Temporary Spare Tires
N 87 mph
P 93 mph
Q 99 mph Studless & Studdable Winter Tires
R 106 mph H.D. Light Truck Tires
S 112 mph Family Sedans & Vans
T 118 mph Family Sedans & Vans
U 124 mph
H 130 mph Sport Sedans & Coupes
V 149 mph Sport Sedans, Coupes & Sports Cars
W 168 mph Exotic Sports Cars
Y 186 mph Exotic Sports Cars
Z 149 mph +
* W- and Y-speed ratings are subcategories of the Z-speed rating.


However, for my safety and that of other drivers plus better fuel mileage and reduction in wear/tear on the tow vehicle and the camper, I travel in the 60-65 mph speed range.

Next spring I will be replacing the 4 tires on my 2012 toy hauler that has the original tires on it with plenty of tread but slightly weather checking evident.
I will replace with either Maxxis or Goodyear Endurance ~ not that I will drive faster but will appreciate the additional margin of safety.
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Old 09-30-2018, 02:11 PM   #4
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We used to tow our 2014 FunFinder 189 fbs with 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee 2wd and it was adequate on flat land for the
weight of the trailer and our stuff but not so good on long grades. Traded the 2014 JGC for 2016 JGC with diesel engine. What a difference.
Diesels are very suited to towing heavy loads. No problem on long grades and fuel mileage is 15 - 16 mpg towing, 20 - 25 mpg around town and 30 + mpg highway. You are probably ok with gas JGC, they are a good ttow vehicle.
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Old 10-01-2018, 07:23 AM   #5
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thanks for the info!
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Old 10-07-2018, 01:23 PM   #6
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I used to pull with a JGC and then a Pathfinder of the same size. Both did OK, both needed weight distribution. Play with the tounge weight, different TV’s like different weights and different trailers will tack better at there own unique TW. We ended up getting a Ram Exodiesel. It’s the baby 3.0L diesel, about the Same HP as the JGC, but 3x the torque. Biggest benefit is the wider and longer wheel base. The Ram is less reactive to forces the trailer transfers to the TV
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Old 10-07-2018, 07:24 PM   #7
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You might consider adding a larger transmission cooler and be very careful of towing in OD. To keep the transmission temperatures down you may need to spin the engine a little faster. A trans temp gauge is a good investment as well as a water temp gauge calibrated in degrees rather than just three bands. Keep in mind that the trans is $$$ so protect the one you have.
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Old 10-07-2018, 09:56 PM   #8
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Yeah, what Jimbo said!
Towing in OD can make more heat in the torque converter. Use with caution.
If you have a "tow/haul" mode use it.

Alan
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