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Old 08-15-2010, 04:44 PM   #1
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Default Freezing lines and propane questions

We are planning an extended trip back to the midwest in September and will be visiting some places with potentially low temps like Yellowstone. If we hear that the night time temp will be below 30 degrees for 5 hours is there anything we need/can to do to protect our pipes from damage? Also, do we keep the propane turned on to keep the frig/freezer working while we do our daily driving?
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Old 08-16-2010, 07:33 PM   #2
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Default Freezing & Propane

I have an FF-189 that I took from Virginia to Florida last January and to the Grand Canyon in May (Snow on ground, temps in hi 20's). I didn't have a problem with freezing. I think temps in the high 20's are Ok for short duration. If you look under the trailer, the water lines run close to the floor which will be a little warmer than surronding air because the interior of the trailer is heated (I'm guessing you like to be comfortable). However, at highway speeds the cold air is going to blast the water lines. It would be a good idea to drain the lines while the trailer is moving. This is easy with the drain plugs that hang down near the axles.

When moving set the fridge on auto. Mine operates preferentially on electric. I have been known to forget to turn off the gas, but I usually drive with it off.
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Old 08-16-2010, 11:51 PM   #3
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Thank you for responding...I was especially encouraged to hear that you took your FF across country. As we are new to the whole TT experience, we were beginning to question our sanity with this cross country undertaking. Thanks for the info on the pipes, especially about being on the road - hadn't thought about that!!!

I thought if you put the frig on auto, it went to either elec or propane. How does that help the frig if you turn the propane off and you are on the road? What keeps the frig cold?
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Old 08-17-2010, 05:39 AM   #4
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This year and last year I took a 5,000 mile trip from NY to NM ,I didnt see low temps but my fridge was on the whole time.

I left it on auto so propane was on when unpluged.
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Old 08-17-2010, 07:14 PM   #5
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You all are really encouraging about taking long trips. I know it is just our inexperience working on us, but we just want to make sure we haven't left the obvious undone before taking off.
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Old 08-17-2010, 08:35 PM   #6
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We have two long distance trips under our tires; one Virginia to Florida the other to Grand Canyon by way of Albequerque. the latter was 5500 miles. no real problems except lower gas mileage than I anticipated. I get about 10-11 mpg with a chevy pickup at 65 mph +/- 5 mph. going slower definitely helps. In Kansas we had to take refuge between two 18-wheelers at a truckstop during a thunderstorm. Had a great nights sleep until the refrigerated truck showed up. Off/On, Off/on all night.
We take along a small electric heater for cool nights when we have a hookup available. This saves on propane and, besides, the trailer furnace sounds like a B-29 warming up for takeoff. Condensation is a major problem in cool wet weather. It helps to leave a window cracked, but we have found that a couple of containers of Dri-Rite, a dehumidifier chemical for closets available from Lowe's, etc., works wonders. We put them in the drawers where food is stored. For some married couples being a maximum of 10 feet apart for days on end might be a problem, but we adjusted, and both of us enjoyed the trip. Good luck. Let us know how it goes.
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Old 08-17-2010, 10:19 PM   #7
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Funny you should mention those items. I've been trying to prepare my husband for lower gas mileage - he thinks we'll get 12-13. I love fantasy land too!!
We had talked of taking an electric heater. Now that you mention the furnace noise, the heater may move to the 'for sure' column.
Living on the arid central coast of California, we hadn't thought about condension - so thanks for the info.
Fortunately, we've been together 24/7 for many years. I have a guy that is fun to travel with and reads my moods pretty well. And as long as I agree to go to all his out of the way fishing places, he is happy too.

I do have one more question though - how do we switch the water coming out from the bathroom faucet to the showerhead? Do you still have the factory install showerhead?
Thanks again for your time -Vickie
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Old 08-18-2010, 09:28 AM   #8
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Before our first trip, I thought 12-14 mpg was doable. Ha! Was I wrong. but mileage is speed and terrain sensitive, so if you can stand to drive 55 mph on the prairie, you'll probably get near 12-13 mpg. The hair on my neck stands up when 18 wheelers bear down on me at 75.

We spent 7 wonderful years in Sacramento and we miss California, but, as a retiree, I can't justify the cost of living out there. You'll really notice the difference in humidity as you travel east. We would frequently awaken to condensation running down the inside of the windows, but the worse thing was a small leak in the slide out and the effects of condensation on the drawers under the dinette. Instant mold! That's when we started with the Dri-Rite. If you have that setup in your FF (It's the 189FDS model), after the trip, take out the drawers, and check the carpet inside the dinette base and under the table. The wet carpet is a great mold breeder.

I still have the factory showerhead because we don't use it much. It's like wrapping yourself in a shower curtin then trying to hit various body parts with a squirt gun. Anyway, to turn on the shower, first turn on the water in the sink, adjust the temperature, pull up on the knob above the faucet, wrap yourself in the shower curtain, and press the button on the handheld shower head. It'll be an adventure. By the way, do you know how to turn on the electric option for the DSI water heater?

You sound like my wife and I. We do okay until the third rainy day in a row then cabin fever sets in and I'll drive a hundred miles just to watch her shop.
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