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Old 10-17-2012, 01:06 PM   #1
Lon
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Default Leveling a 2007 X160 Fun Finder

I continually have problems keeping my refrigerator running. I understand this type of fridge requires a level trailer to operate. I am a first time owner of an RV and consequently a novice. I always have trouble leveling the trailer. I use a bubble level and wooden boards to place under the stabilizers(4, one attached at each corner) and tongue jack. That is it. No other levelers or jacks. This trailer is a two wheel single axle. I always chock the wheels which remain on the ground. I have read the entry on leveling wherein another user mentioned fridge problems as well. My problem is that once those stabilizers touch the boards and are snug it is nearly impossible to crank them down any further. That is not an issue with the tongue jack under which I also place boards. Consequently my only recourse is to vary the number of boards I place under each stabilizer and the tongue jack. This quickly gets laborious. Does anyone know if I need some other device or jack in order to achieve joy. Can you tell me how to accomplish proper leveling or lead me to an article that will? Right now I keep an iced cooler for emergency backup, but on a summer day if I am unaware or gone for several hours the food inside the fridge can get pretty rank .
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Old 10-17-2012, 02:00 PM   #2
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I have a 160 as well. You should not use the stabilizer jacks to level, they are only used to stabilize. Use the tounge jack to level front to back and get a set of boards to drive the wheels over to level side to side. The stabilizer jacks are not strong enough to lift the trailer and hold all that weight. Hope this helps.
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Old 10-17-2012, 02:49 PM   #3
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^+1. As aubbenslv stated the stabilizer jacks aren't strong enough to level out the trailer. For side to side you can use a series of boards wide enough so the tire is completely supported and doesn't hang over the side or edge. There are also commercially available sets of square blocks similar to these:

http://www.campingworld.com/shopping...s-8-pack/43849

These 'legos' are nice because they are lightweight and easy to stack.

And use the tongue jack to level front to back.
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Old 10-17-2012, 03:12 PM   #4
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Another option is to get a pull through sight they tend to be level.
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Old 10-17-2012, 04:46 PM   #5
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Default Leveling a 2007 X160 Fun Finder

I appreciate your input. Bear in mind that I am currently alone. That said, say I back or drive the tires over these boards also assuming I am not on level ground...this means when leveling side to side one side will be higher than the other and in order to make it level I must add another board(s)(of varying thickness) to the lower side. This means I have to either jack up the trailer to insert another board(and hope it is the right thikness) and then let it down to see if I have added the board of proper thickness. Or I do a similar operation by driving off the boards and back on. This seems excessive effort. I'm I missing something? Perhaps if I knew by looking at the bubble level how much the bubble was off center equated to a certain thickness(height) this would help, but I am unfamiliar with this. Or do I measure the difference in height of one side to the other and thereby have an idea of the board thickness needed. This would also require having boards of many thicknesses available. Sure seems like a lot of work. The ice chest is beginning to sound like a better alternative. Feedback is welcome.
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Old 10-17-2012, 06:01 PM   #6
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Leveling is my challenge also. I bought the leveling wedges and the legos because mine is a dule wheel makes it a bit more of a challenge. They have a level companion for lack of other words that helps me I am typically by myself at time of setup as well. People show up to use it after work is done and leave before time to leave. But I guess that's camping I don't really mind because I get it done the way I need to the first time.

Its a little cheap. Think I got it from camping world. Seems to eat batteries. Think it was a waste of money. Typical of me I try to make things easy as possible.

I have become a pretty good judge on how many board when the level shows this or that. I couldn't use a bubble level though I bought the long level straight with 3 bubbles works better and by how far I lift it up I can judge the board needed.

Good luck hope this helps you out and enjoy your camper.
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Old 10-18-2012, 05:14 AM   #7
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Even if you aren't completely level, this shouldn't be an issue. I ALWAYS make sure my stove burners work first. It clears out the propane line of any air bubbles. I almost always have air in the lines since I turn the propane on and off while traveling, then using the campler, then parking it at home. Until you get the burners to work, the fridge won't work. Hope that helps!
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Old 10-18-2012, 05:17 AM   #8
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Oh, also: the folks who installed my large bubble level didn't install it on level ground! So, as the other posted said "do an eye level check" too. I now basically ignore my bubble level or adjust for it's off balance position!
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Old 10-18-2012, 08:22 AM   #9
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You don't need to be EXACTLY level, you just have to get close. The reason the fridge doesn't work well when it's not level ist that liquid ammonia won't flow properly and collects in the tubing reducing or blocking the flow.

With a bit of practice you can get a pretty good idea of how many boards or legos you'll need to get level. And again it doesn't need to be perfect. The legos are also a bit easier to work with than boards. They aren't nearly as heavy and if you need to raise it a bit more you can simply add the needed amount in front and pull forward another foot or so.

Also check that there is propane in the line as FF160_CT mentioned. If there's some air in the line when you first fire up the fridge that could cause it to shut off. Might not be a leveling issue at all.
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Old 10-18-2012, 10:59 AM   #10
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Leveling can be really easy... Here's the system I've used for years, I used it on my bumper pull and I use it on my 5th wheel...single, dual or tri-axle, it doesn't matter

First thing you need to do is get a set of "Lego" blocks:

Leveling block set

I actually carry two sets and with the 5th wheel I'm considering a third set...some I use for leveling and the rest I use to place the stabilizer jack pads on. Stabilizers become less effective the further they are extended. Their best "stabilization" occurs at about 50% extended. Use the extra blocks you carry to "build up" a base so that the stabilizers are only extended about half way.

The next thing you'll need is a good trailer mounted level... I use this one, again on my old bumper pulls and now on my 5th wheel:

Jumbo Level, Dual reading

The graduations on the level are equal to one of the Lego leveling blocks. You'll need to take your trailer out to a level parking lot and get it level using a carpenter's level. When you are getting the trailer level, use the trailer's inside floor or counter as the leveling point, not the trailer tongue as the tongue may or may not be level to the frame where the refrigerator sits, the floor inside next to the refrigerator is your best bet. Once your trailer is level, side to side and front to back, you can mount the Jumbo level. Pick an area on the front of the trailer where you can see it in your rear view mirror; doing so will allow you to maneuver the trailer to the most level portion of the site without getting out of your vehicle. Once the level is mounted on the trailer you can adjust the front to back bubble portion to read properly (instructions with level will tell you how to do it). Once your initial calibration is done, you're ready to go camping.

When you get to your campsite, look in the side view mirror (remember; you mounted the Jumbo so that you can see it without getting out of the vehicle) and usually you can jockey the trailer around, while watching the level, to get it within half a mark. The level is set so that one mark = one of the Lego blocks. If you can get within half a marking, you are good enough to call it quits. Half a mark is only 1/2" and that is plenty level for both the refrigerator and your personal comfort. If you can't get to half a mark, it is time to use the Lego blocks. Even if the tilt isn't a full mark off, say it is 3/4's of a mark off, a 1" Lego will tilt the trailer the other way and you'll only be 1/4" off of level...see how that works? Since you've already stated you are "solo", you won't have anyone to watch your tires to say "STOP!" when you are on the block, so, lay out two blocks end to end; that way you can just pull forward or backward about 8" and you'll be straddle the two of them. Say you've done your best and you just can't get closer than two marks on the level...that's where the "Lego" part comes in...lay out several blocks one level high and then build another course on top, half a block offset so that the second level of blocks straddles the first level. That will build a 2" high ramp that you can then drive up onto. Works with single axles and tandem axles and tri-axles; I've done them all and never found a site that I couldn't get within 1/2" of dead level.

Once you are side to side level, unhook your trailer and using the same Jumbo level, look at the front to rear secondary level and raise or lower your tongue jack until the bubble is in the marked area. Once that is done, take your spare blocks and use them under your stabilizers...they won't sink into the ground and the stabilizers will be more effective.

Done...your trailer is now dead level front to back and within 1/2" minimum of being dead level side to side. Plenty level to have your refrigerator work and work most efficiently, be comfortable moving around your trailer (nobody enjoys walking on a tilted floor) and level enough that your omelets won't be thicker on one side than the other!

Here's a photo of one of our campsites...you can see that I was able to jockey the trailer around to be within 1/2" of level as there aren't any blocks under the tires and I've used the Lego blocks to put under my stabilizers. You can see that the rear stabilizers, without using the blocks, would have to be fully extended. Fully extended they would have been virtually vertical (can't stabilize when your stabilizers are like a stick) and wouldn't have had much weight on them; the blocks allow them to be angled and applying some pressure on the Legos. You never want to jack the trailer with the stabilizers, but, you do want some downward pressure to "stabilize" that corner of the trailer.

[/i]

Here's a picture of my 5th wheel where you can see that I have two layers of blocks under the wheels to get the rig level and spare blocks under the rear stabilizers (5th wheels only have stabilizers in the back):





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Old 10-18-2012, 12:47 PM   #11
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Great job web slave. Thanks for the dbetails,. I need to look into these jumbo levels 4 sure
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Old 10-18-2012, 01:07 PM   #12
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Default Leveling a 2007 X160 Fun Finder

Thanks to everyone for your input especially Webslave(Don) who exceeded my expectations with a stellar presentation including links and pictures. Don I know you went to a lot of effort and I appreciate that. Definitely more than 2 cents worth, more like 50x that or a dollars worth. I took inflation into account.
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